Thursday, August 15, 2019

The Noble Guardian by Michelle Griep

The Noble Guardian by Michelle Griep

Oh, I love this cover! Couldn’t resist this one.

Let’s begin with the summary:

A Cross-Country Trip through Regency England Brings Intrigue, Rogues, and High Adventure

The must-read conclusion to Michelle Griep’s Bow Street Runners Trilogy: Life couldn’t be better for Abigail Gilbert—but it’s been a long time in coming. Having lived with a family who hated her, it’s finally her time for love. Abby sets off on a journey across England to marry one of the most prestigious gentlemen in the land—until highwaymen upset her plans and threaten her life.

Horse patrol captain Samuel Thatcher arrives just in time to save Abby. But she’s simply another victim in a job he’s come to despise. Tired of the dark side of humanity, he intends to buy land and retire.

Abby pleads with him to escort her for the rest of her journey. He refuses—until she offers him something he desperately needs to achieve his goal. . .money. Delivering her safely will give him more than enough to buy property.

So begins an impossible trek for the cynical lawman and the proper lady. Each will be indelibly changed by the time they reach her betrothed, if they don’t kill one another first—or fall in love.

And now, my review:

This story made me laugh aloud at some places. Because this is a Christian novel, no cussing is allowed. So the hero has some inventive expletives to share, and they are hilarious. Well done. Overall, the author’s humor is fun throughout.

That said about swearing, there were a few places where the prose seemed to take the Lord’s name in vain, which made me cringe. Like: “Lord, but his bones ached.” Or “Oh God, if I’d known.” These instances didn’t read as prayers. There were also phrases in the ARC (advanced reader copy) that seemed far too modern, like “crying jag” and “kicking back.”


There was a lot of melodrama in this novel. I’ve seen this in a few historicals lately. It was overwhelming at times. I ended up skimming now and then. The heroine struck me as immature, indecisive, and foolish. It was difficult to respect her because she seemed incapable of wisdom. She could be strong and brave, but her foolishness nearly canceled out those good traits. There were contrived elements in the plot, and there was a bit too much gore in some scenes.

The author did a good job with male characterization. Her hero is a “man of intention” and easily respected.

I think with less overstated emotions and descriptions, and with fewer contrived scenarios, plus a competent heroine, this book would have appealed to me more.

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